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Paul : part 2

This is the power point presentation and lecture on china painting given by Marci Blattenberger and Paul Lewing at the NCECA clay conference in Seattle , WA on Thursday , March 29,2012

Also, this space will include other filmed china painting events .

Paul : part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 8:55 pm

The human figure has always been a favorite subject of china painters. China paint easily lends itself to very subtle blending of colors, enabling portraits of greater depth and luminosity than any other medium. San Do is the best known American painter of faces, although he is incredibly skilled at other imagery as well.

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Jane Marcks has been well known as a portraitist for a long time. Mariela Villasmil-Kaminski uses a much more painterly style and teaches a fantastic portrait workshop. (China painting seminars tend to be listed according to subject matter taught rather than technique, as in the clay world.)

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Becky Syroka is emerging as one of the premier china painting portraitists today. As with the plant imagery, some work in a looser style, as in this work by Donna Guy. Another well known portrait painter is our own Marci Blattenberger

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Although china paint is usually applied with brushes, it can be made to do anything that any form of paint or ink will do. One technique that a lot of traditional china painters use is pen work, in which liquid paint of a very particular consistency is applied with an old fashioned steel lettering pen. (Alice Wofford, Ruby Tobey, Joyce Sandberg, Laurie Farthing)

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Because of its consistent color that can be as bright or as subtle as you want it, and its ability to adapt itself to any application technique, china paint is quickly gaining acceptance among a new generation of clay artists. It is finally taking its rightful place in the arsenal of decorating techniques alongside underglazes, glazes, lusters, atmospheric firings and so on. Often a clay artist will begin using china paints by incorporating a small amount, to get specific colors, as in these works by Kelly King, Kirk Mangus and Rob Spencer.

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Re: Paul : part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 8:57 pm

Others, like Joan Takayama-Ogawa, Meryl Ruth

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and Keisuke Mizuno incorporate china paints into such a complex scheme that it’s sometimes hard to tell what’s china paint and what’s not.

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One recent convert to china painting is Jason Walker, whose work has been exclusively black and white for the last few years. Be sure to take in his demonstration in the main ballroom

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We see increasing use of china paint also in the form of full color decals, both custom-made and off-the-rack. Single-color sepia tone laser decals, like Terrie Banhazi’s, are often colored with china paints. Too often commercial decals are plopped onto a form seemingly at random, with no apparent purpose, but in other cases, the imagery supplied by the decals is integral to the design

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These works by Leopold L. Foulem, Richard Milette,

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Re: Paul : part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 8:59 pm

...John Britt, and Rain Harris are good examples.

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Rimas VisGirda uses contemporary and antique decals alongside his own hand-printed decals, to very good effect.

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Andre Van de Putte also prints his own decals. While decals represent an important new direction in the use of china paint, they’re not really about china painting. I could gather dozens of examples of interesting decal work, but that’s not really what this lecture is about.

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This piece by Garth Johnson, which was in the NCECA National in Portland, uses custom printed decals applied to plates that already had a design on them. Garth is one of the most creative and fun clay artists around today and this piece, in which he has shot plates with china paint-loaded paint-ball guns is a good example.

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You can use china paints on any fired ceramic surface. Here we see Kevin Myers’ use of it on raku (he has to resmoke between china paint firings).

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Re: Paul : part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:02 pm

Julia Whitney gets an amazing “ghost” image by painting on her wood-fired work, wiping it off and firing to cone 018, where the image reappears. Gerry Wallace accents salt-fired work with china paint.

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Charlie Krafft’s “Disaster-Ware” series is done on used and scorched china.

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Julie Green also employs used china in her “Last Supper” series depicting the last meals of Death Row inmates.

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I also decorate some of what I call “Rescued Pots” with rubber and foam stamps, decal fragments, pens, dispersion techniques, masking, wipeouts, and anything else I can come up with.

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China paint is more like paint than any other ceramic medium, which makes it an ideal choice for tile painting. In my tile mural work, I mostly apply it with brushes, but I also spray it, print it, letter with it and make it into crayons.

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Re: Paul : part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:50 pm

( more of Paul's work )

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This mural by Paige Lukens-Gray is hand-painted,

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while most of the tiles in Gregory Aliberti’s are screen-printed.

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The most exciting new direction in china painting, however, is the use of china paints as the exclusive source of color on forms designed specifically to be painted. China paint’s controllability and range of effects make it ideal for representational art. The best known clay artist who works in this vein is Kurt Weiser,

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who’s been doing this amazing work for many years now.

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Re: Paul : part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:51 pm

Two artists who use china paints on more or less functional ware are Russell Coates, an Englishman trained in Japan who makes his own paints,

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and John W. Hopkins. While china paint is not for food-contact surfaces, it can be used on the outsides of functional pieces and on ware not intended for food use.

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Darien Johnson, one of Kurt’s students, airbrushes most of this china paint.

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Jeremy Jernigan mixes his paint with gum and dries it with a heat gun to get this peeled-paint look.

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Cindy Kolodziejski sometimes combines her painted sculptures with other materials.

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Re: Paul : part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:52 pm

Irina Zaytceva employs lots of burnished gold with her china paint

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My favorite among the new generation of china painters, and the one who to me most embodies what china paint can do, is another of Kurt Weiser’s students, Bridget Cherie Harper.

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Her imagery is fascinating, her brushwork is varied and controlled, and her union of form and imagery is masterful. This, as I see it, is the new direction for china painting.

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continued at : Marci Blattenberger part 1
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