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Marci- part 2

This is the power point presentation and lecture on china painting given by Marci Blattenberger and Paul Lewing at the NCECA clay conference in Seattle , WA on Thursday , March 29,2012

Also, this space will include other filmed china painting events .

Marci- part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 10:13 pm

FIBERGLASS- Fiberglass can also be fired onto a surface, leaving an interesting texture that can then be covered with china paint, gold or lusters.

(Fiberglass requires a hotter than normal fire... in the range of 010 )

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LUSTERS- Resinate lusters create a beautiful transparent surface that resembles colored cellophane and/or an iridescence like the surface of a soap bubble. The resin, which is mixed in with the metallic salts, burns in the kiln, creating a localized reduction. Most lusters are brown or orange in the bottle, so working with them is a blind process. You don’t know what you have until after it has been fired. They can be applied with a brush and used like paint, but are often applied by floating small amounts on the surface of warm water and dipping the piece, or applying random patches and flowing them with a dispersing fluid or turpentine.
Lusters can combine in unexpected ways. Yellow and blue won’t necessarily make green.

The pictures below show 1,2 and 3 coats of luster applied over previously fired coats.

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Carol Korros gets some fantastic effects by floating lusters on water , then dipping the piece into
floating film .


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Halo lusters are a particular type of luster that produces little repelled rings when a brush dipped into the luster is touched to a surface already covered with the unfired luster . Interesting effects can be also obtained by touching metallic halo lusters to non-metallic halo lusters or to non- halo lusters.

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Lusters can also be brushed on just as you would brush on paint. The difficulty with this technique is not being able to see what the color results are until after firing.

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In this piece by master artist, Peter Faust, Peter flows lusters in sheets of color allowing them to mingle, then fires, masks off a design over the fired luster and then flows other colors on top , creating some beautiful color blends.


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Lusters applied over a fired coat of liquid bright gold, platinum or copper luster can produce some very spectacular effects. Here you see a traditional mother of pearl luster fired over a white surface showing its usual soap bubble iridescence, yet swirled over a fired coat of liquid bright gold, it produces a myriad of strong, metallic color.
And my vase is turquoise luster over fired liquid bright gold.
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And small amounts of common table salt sprinkled onto this turquoise luster while it was still wet resulted in pink speckles where the salt affected the luster.
You can also see lusters on which dispersing fluid has been dropped on the jewelry piece on the right.

M102.jpg
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Re: Marci- part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 10:16 pm

CRYSTAL MAGIC- This is one of my special effects. I had been trying to obtain a faux crystalline effect and had been tossing some ideas around with a chemist friend of mine. The result: Crystal Magic. It is a lacquer based product which will harden on to a glazed surface so it can be used for cold effects, the most spectacular of which is over fired liquid bright gold, but a coat of resinate luster can be rubbed into the surface of the product after it has formed the patterns and fired, which leaves the luster in the crystalline pattern.

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It can also be underpainted with china paint or luster (or underglaze) and then fired with a darker luster for additional effects.

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CHIP OFF POWDER- Chip off is mixed with water or milk and then applied either thinly or liberally over a glazed surface. It fires into an ugly gray glassy mass that deliberately sets up a stress in the glaze. It pops off, taking the underlying glaze with it and also some of the clay layer. The resulting texture in the clay layer can be very fine and delicate if the powder is applied thinly and evenly or very rough if applied heavily, looking almost as if a hammer and chisel were applied to the clay surface. The surface can then be covered with liquid bright gold. There are also very fine glass beads available for a similar process that leave a very delicate etch .

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ACID ETCH AND FAUX ETCHING- Since china painters work on already glazed surfaces, we do not have the luxury of carving our clay surfaces in the traditional ways potters would, so we have to abrade the surface in other ways. Some contemporary china painters, like Mary Gosden and Cheri Holder , sand blast their surfaces but most create a multilevel surface by etching.
The traditional method is using a strong acid to eat away the glazed surface. A mask of asphaltum varnish, a tar-like substance, is used to protect the surfaces that you want to remain glazed (including the back), and then the piece is very carefully dipped in an acid solution and neutralized. The asphaltum is removed with kerosene, the piece is fired to burn off any excess residue and gold is applied and fired. The result is a shinier gold where the glaze remains and a more matt gold where the glaze has been eaten away. Needless to say, it’s a dangerous process that requires full protective gear that only a few are equipped to handle. So the alternative, which produces an acceptable substitute, is gold underlay.

In this piece by Mario Wantanabe, and the following one by Grace Noland, you can see where the flowers were painted with the asphaltum leaving the shine of the glaze intact , and where the background was then eroded by the acid,leaving a matt surface. It is then covered with gold which highlights the shiny/matt variations.

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M108.jpg
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Re: Marci- part 2

Postby marcib » Wed Apr 04, 2012 10:18 pm

Some contemporary artists are now also sandblasting their surfaces to get a multilevel effect . This works especially well in Mary Gosden's architectural work.

M109.jpg


In the section above, I talked about the danger of doing traditional acid etching to selectively remove sections of glaze to create a matt/shiny contrast .
There is a safer option . Although nothing compares to the look of true acid etch , faux etching can produce a reasonable facsimile ... and can product a lovely white on white look of its own when used with Mother of Pearl rather than gold.


GOLD UNDERLAY – Underlay is a matte paint that is mixed with a tinting agent that fires away, leaving a white, matte surface, although there are some yellow underlays. It can be sponged on over a resist which is peeled off before firing or it can be mixed with a waterbased drying medium and applied evenly with a sponge, dried thoroughly and then, using a sgraffito technique, the design can be scratched into the powder. It is then fired and gold applied and fired again. The result is a shiny gold where the design has been scratched into the powder, revealing the glaze underneath and a matte gold where the gold is fired over the powder. A delicate alternate white-on-white effect can be achieved by firing Mother of Pearl over the fired and scratched powder.

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Closeup of one of Karen Grubaugh's pieces showing the red masking fluid used to mask and preserve the glazed sections of the design .

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Another of Keiko Shimizu's pieces showing off many different techniques. The faux etch can be seen in the white on white areas.

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Paul and I both want to again thank all of the artists whose amazing work allowed us to offer this presentation . It would have been impossible to do this without you all.

A big thank you also to NCECA for allowing us to show what chinapainters can do .....and a HUGE thank you from me to Paul Lewing for opening my eyes and showing me that there is more to the world of potters than brown pots . ;thumps;
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